Congratulations to our Class of 2018 Undergraduate Minor Grads!

ISP launched its undergraduate minor during the Fall 2015 semester. We're proud to celebrate the accomplishments of our Class of 2018, and we wish them all the successes they deserve!

Rebecca Chambers

Rebecca ChambersMajors: Environmental Studies and Geography
Hometown: Warrensburg, Missouri
Why did you decide to minor in ISP? I was actually working the Crimson and Blue event for the Geography department and talking with incoming freshman. I found the Indigenous Studies table and ended up taking a pamphlet on it.
What ISP course was your favorite/had the most effect on your perspective, research direction, etc.? My favorite class was a class I took abroad called Aboriginal Sydney. It was interesting learning about Indigenous people in Australia while I was living there
What do plan to do after graduation, and how does your coursework in Indigenous Studies help accomplish that? I plan on attending the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law to study environmental law. Environmental law and Indigenous law have many points of overlap, which is part of what drew me to the minor.
Do you have any advice for others interested in exploring the ISP minor? I added the minor my second-to-last semester, so I advise students to plan a little more in advance if they plan on getting a minor!

 

Richardson ChickawayRichardson Chickaway

Major: Psychology
Hometown: Conehatta, Mississippi
Why did you decide to minor in ISP? Seeking more truths of Native American history due to distorted history taught in schools of elementary, secondary, etc.
What ISP course was your favorite/had the most effect on your perspective, research direction, etc.? All, because they were very informative, regardless if I might have not been in total agreement.
Do you have any advice for others interested in exploring the ISP minor? American history begins prior to, during and after European contact, and if you're passionate, pursue it with an open mind and without hesitation. Take advantage of the opportunities the program offers. It is a wonderful program that has a very helpful, awesome staff and resources. 

 

Sandy SanchezSandra Siomara Sanchez

Majors: History, Chinese Literature & Language (with the ISP minor!)
What ISP course was your favorite/had the most effect on your perspective, research direction, etc.? ISP 800 Indigenous Issues in the U.S. & Canada -- Prof. Fitzgerald invited me to take this graduate course, which introduced me to the theories and methodologies across different topics in Native Studies. With her guidance and the collaborative discussions with other ISP graduate students, I was determined to apply to graduate school with a key focus on the histories of Indigenous peoples. Without this course, and especially Prof. Fitzgerald's help, I definitely don't think I would have been able to craft a successful application.
What do plan to do after graduation, and how does your coursework in Indigenous Studies help accomplish that? I will be starting my Ph.D. in History at Yale University in August, and hope to study citizenship, migration and race in 19th century U.S. history with a specific focus on how unfree labor and immigration affected the experiences of native peoples. My work in the ISP department has consistently helped center my research on Indigenous peoples and issues of sovereignty, as well as pushed me to be interdisciplinary and self-reflective in my research.
Do you have any advice for others interested in exploring the ISP minor? I earnestly believe every student should take at least one class in the ISP department during their time at KU because of how open the department is and for the value of understanding academics through the Indigenous perspective. In my classes I've learned how ethical research decisions and social justice intersect and impact communities beyond the university and as many students embark on their own paths at KU, being able to approach their work with a conscientious and informed mindset is imperative no matter their field. ISP courses are widespread and narrow, and certainly can interest anyone because of the variety of Indigenous methodologies. 


About Indigenous Studies at KU

Welcome to the Indigenous Studies program at the University of Kansas. We accept applications to the M.A. program and graduate certificate on a rolling basis. Visit the Admission page for more information. We also offer an undergraduate minor in Indigenous Studies.

The Indigenous Studies master’s degree program provides students with in-depth knowledge of Indigenous peoples’ complex and diverse cultures and histories, as well as their impacts on the global society. Our multidisciplinary program offers students the advantage of studying relevant issues from a wide range of academic perspectives. The expertise of our affiliate faculty members includes Native American history; Indigenous literature; ethnobotany; Indigenous peoples' cultural survival and political activism; American Indian tribal governments; Indigenous geographies; Native American religions; and much more.

Our master’s program allows students to develop an area of specialization in which to build their expertise. Students can choose either a thesis or portfolio option to complete their degrees. We also offer a joint degree with the Law School.  Students may graduate with both the J.D. and an M.A. in Indigenous Studies in three to four years, making it an ideal choice for students interested in tribal law. With rolling admissions, our program offers the flexibility to apply at your convenience and to begin your studies either in the fall or the spring semester.

Empowered by the resources on campus and in our community, we strive to provide unique learning opportunities for our students that go beyond the classroom. Please explore our website to learn more about what we have to offer, and feel free to contact us with questions.


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Local Events

American Indian Cultural Festival
Sunday, September 16 | 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Celebration of the art, dance, and music of American Indians from regions across the country
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak St., Kansas City, MO
Events are free and open to the public

Visiting Lecture and Discussion: "Following the Pathways of my Ancestors: Living Ancestral Geographies in Aotearoa, New Zealand"
Dr. Naomi Simmonds, lecturer with the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies, and senior researcher with Te Kotahi Research Institute, at the University of Waikato
Monday, September 17 | Noon-1 p.m.
Parker Hall 110, Haskell Indian Nations University
Open to students, faculty and staff

Natives @ KU Kickoff
Tuesday, September 18 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Rice Room, 5th floor of Green Hall (Law School)
University of Kansas
Free taco bar; RSVP to nfsc@ku.edu by September 4
Open to all Native KU faculty, staff and students

"Rhetorical Practices in Indigenous Museums"
Skype Q&A with Dr. Lisa King, assistant professor at the University of Tennessee
Wednesday, September 19 | 3 p.m.
Kansas Room, Kansas Union
University of Kansas
Free and open to all KU and Haskell faculty, staff and students
Sponsored by the Museum Studies Program

"Warrior Women" Film Screening & Q&A with director/producer Elizabeth Castle and activist Madonna Thunder Hawk
Part of the Free State Festival
Wednesday, September 19 | 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Lawrence Arts Center
940 New Hampshire St., Lawrence, KS
Tickets are $8

Visiting Lecture and Discussion: "Setting a Tribal Research Agenda"
Prof. Ed Galindo, faculty member at the University of Idaho and associate director for education and diversity for the NASA Idaho Space Grant Consortium
Thursday, September 20 | 7 p.m.-8 p.m.
Burge Union Forum AB, University of Kansas
Open to students, faculty and staff

Keeping Legends Alive
Friday and Saturday, September 21-22
Celebration of the dedication of the U.S.'s first WWI memorial, Haskell Stadium and Memorial Arch, dedicated in 1926
The weekend's activities will include a powwow, educational workshops, campus tours, children's activities, a family fun run, and much more.
Haskell Indian Nations University
155 Indian Ave., Lawrence, KS
Free and open to the public
Volunteers needed! Sign up to volunteer on Saturday, September 22

"Mankiller" Film Screening and Q&A with filmmaker Valerie Red-Horse
Part of the Free State Festival
Friday, September 21 | 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
Haskell Indian Nations University Auditorium
155 Indian Ave., Lawrence, KS
Free and open to the public

"Peacemaking in Indian Country" with Prof. Shawn Watts
Monday, October 8 | Noon-1 p.m.
Big XII Room, Kansas Union
University of Kansas
Light refreshments provided
Open to all faculty, staff and students
Sponsored by the KU Office of the Provost

Indigenous Peoples Day Conference: "Indigenous Female Leadership: Disrupting dominant discourses"
Monday, October 8 | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Kansas State Student Union
918 N. 17th St.
Manhattan, KS
Features keynotes by Elizabeth Kronk Warner, J.D., KU Law; Dr. Robin Zape-Tah-Hol-Ah Minthorn, University of New Mexico; Dr. Maggie Walter, University of Tasmania and Oz to Oz Fulbright Scholar; and screening and discussion of Warrior Women
Free, but registration required. Livestreaming available.

Haskell Fall Welcome Back Powwow
Saturday, October 13 | Grand entry 6 p.m.
Haskell Indian Nations University Powwow Grounds
155 Indian Ave., Lawrence, KS
Open to the public

Watch Party: Episode 1 of Native America, "From Caves to Cosmos"
PBS documentary series
Tuesday, October 23 | 8 p.m.-9 p.m.
Traditions Area, main lobby of the Kansas Union
University of Kansas
Free

Watch Party: Episode 2 of Native America, "Nature to Nations"
PBS documentary series
Tuesday, October 30 | 8 p.m.-9 p.m.
Traditions Area, main lobby of the Kansas Union
University of Kansas
Free

Watch Party: Episodes 3 and 4 of Native America, "Cities of the Sky" and "New World Rising"
PBS documentary series
Tuesday, November 13 | 8 p.m.-10 p.m.
Traditions Area, main lobby of the Kansas Union
University of Kansas
Free

Honoring Our Warriors Powwow
Saturday, November 17 | Grand entries at 1 p.m. and 6 p.m.
Coffin Sports Complex, Haskell Indian Nations University
155 Indian Ave., Lawrence, KS
Open to the public

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